About Benjamin Blachère

French Online Marketer previously based in Sydney. Launched a Web Marketing Agency in Paris, SLAP digital where we help our clients to increase their traffic, the size of their membership databases as well as their revenues. Passionate about web marketing, I have previously launched my own website, a community for people in Long Distance Relationships.

Topics ...

  • Advertising
  • Analytics
  • E-commerce
  • General
  • Mergers & Acquisitions
  • Other
  • ... of discussion

  • Mobile
  • Music
  • Other
  • SEO
  • Social Media
  • Trends / Insights
  • Social Media

    02
    Feb

    Facebook penetration by country – Jan 2011

    Here is a list of countries listed from highest Facebook penetration to lowest. This list was put together by this great facebook stats website based on January 2011 data compared to the month of December 2010.

    Interesting to note:

    • The Falkland Islands has the highest Internet Penetration, even though its total number of Facebook users has dropped by close to 30%! What happened? My guess, a british battalion had to go home..
    • China has (unsurprisingly) one of the lowest penetration rates, however Hong Kong and Taiwan have some of the highests, imagine what market/revenues Facebook is missing out on. No doubt they must be busy trying to convince the Chinese authorities to relax their ban. And maybe it’s actually happening as China had the highest growth in number of users both from a total number and percentage perspective in the past month.
    • The other country experiencing a huge user growth is the Democratic Republic of Congo, which might be a sign that African countries Social Media adoption is going to experience a huge growth in 2011.
    # Country Users Growth Pen.
    1.

    Falkland Islands

    1 820 -540 -29.67% 71.48%
    2.

    Monaco

    21 320 +2 700 +12.66% 69.71%
    3.

    Iceland

    193 480 -18 120 -9.37% 62.63%
    4.

    Faroe Islands

    27 180 +1 880 +6.92% 55.40%
    5.

    Gibraltar

    15 840 -220 -1.39% 54.85%
    6.

    Hong Kong

    3 695 400 +23 760 +0.64% 52.12%
    7.

    Norway

    2 417 240 -47 800 -1.98% 51.69%
    8.

    Taiwan

    11 755 680 +3 404 880 +28.96% 51.06%
    9.

    Canada

    16 841 560 -296 840 -1.76% 49.89%
    10.

    Turks and Caicos Islands

    11 560 -2 620 -22.66% 49.13%
    11.

    United States

    148 867 700 +1 879 480 +1.26% 47.99%
    12.

    Cayman Islands

    23 800 -6 520 -27.40% 47.40%
    13.

    Singapore

    2 214 360 -242 800 -10.96% 47.10%
    14.

    Brunei

    185 800 -8 860 -4.77% 47.03%
    15.

    Denmark

    2 545 640 -89 540 -3.52% 46.15%
    16.

    The Bahamas

    141 980 +3 680 +2.59% 45.74%
    17.

    Chile

    7 586 240 +64 080 +0.84% 45.30%
    18.

    United Kingdom

    28 041 780 -622 120 -2.22% 44.98%
    19.

    Australia

    9 425 660 -326 640 -3.47% 44.33%
    20.

    Sweden

    3 986 740 -55 520 -1.39% 43.94%
    21.

    Israel

    3 128 780 +980 +0.03% 42.55%
    22.

    New Zealand

    1 769 460 -30 240 -1.71% 42.00%
    23.

    Malta

    169 340 -4 880 -2.88% 41.63%
    24.

    Saint Kitts and Nevis

    20 500 +2 760 +13.46% 41.08%
    25.

    Aruba

    42 380 -2 340 -5.52% 40.52%
    26.

    Macedonia

    820 140 +75 000 +9.14% 39.58%
    27.

    Ireland

    1 784 720 +25 780 +1.44% 38.61%
    28.

    Bermuda

    26 220 -940 -3.59% 38.41%
    29.

    Malaysia

    9 937 580 +392 760 +3.95% 37.99%
    30.

    Montenegro

    252 140 +76 100 +30.18% 37.82%
    31.

    United Arab Emirates

    1 850 620 -285 320 -15.42% 37.19%
    32.

    Isle of Man

    31 180 -3 820 -12.25% 37.18%
    33.

    Barbados

    106 060 -320 -0.30% 37.13%
    34.

    Belgium

    3 812 560 -37 740 -0.99% 36.58%
    35.

    Puerto Rico

    1 430 220 +77 480 +5.42% 35.95%
    36.

    Netherlands Antilles

    82 200 -5 920 -7.20% 35.94%
    37.

    Cyprus

    394 780 +84 100 +21.30% 35.80%
    38.

    Serbia

    2 580 600 +352 460 +13.66% 35.13%
    39.

    Finland

    1 835 860 -23 820 -1.30% 34.93%
    40.

    Antigua

    30 160 -5 180 -17.18% 34.77%
    41.

    Albania

    1 036 220 +13 720 +1.32% 34.69%
    42.

    British Virgin Islands

    8 600 -4 040 -46.98% 34.48%
    43.

    Greenland

    19 720 +1 540 +7.81% 34.21%
    44.

    Bahrain

    247 680 -28 900 -11.67% 33.56%
    45.

    Qatar

    277 160 -230 600 -83.20% 32.96%
    46.

    Macau

    186 680 -35 560 -19.05% 32.87%
    47.

    Anguilla

    4 840 -3 280 -67.77% 32.78%
    48.

    Turkey

    25 420 400 +1 256 800 +4.94% 32.67%
    49.

    France

    20 540 560 +37 520 +0.18% 31.71%
    50.

    Trinidad and Tobago

    389 540 +8 940 +2.30% 31.70%
    51.

    Luxembourg

    157 380 -24 560 -15.61% 31.63%
    52.

    Uruguay

    1 088 320 +43 440 +3.99% 31.00%
    53.

    Italy

    17 997 800 +82 680 +0.46% 30.98%
    54.

    St. Lucia

    49 780 +17 400 +34.95% 30.93%
    55.

    Argentina

    12 754 100 +394 040 +3.09% 30.85%
    56.

    Slovakia

    1 682 860 +88 720 +5.27% 30.76%
    57.

    Slovenia

    615 480 +3 660 +0.59% 30.73%
    58.

    Switzerland

    2 341 180 -137 600 -5.88% 30.71%
    59.

    Portugal

    3 247 000 +245 580 +7.56% 30.24%
    60.

    Grenada

    32 240 +700 +2.17% 29.90%
    61.

    Lebanon

    1 228 600 +249 120 +20.28% 29.78%
    62.

    Czech Republic

    3 010 340 +50 360 +1.67% 29.51%
    63.

    Andorra

    24 920 -4 340 -17.42% 29.48%
    64.

    Croatia

    1 309 120 +34 240 +2.62% 29.18%
    65.

    Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

    30 160 -13 380 -44.36% 28.94%
    66.

    Seychelles

    25 140 -4 440 -17.66% 28.46%
    67.

    Venezuela

    7 739 100 +186 020 +2.40% 28.43%
    68.

    New Caledonia

    64 460 -3 000 -4.65% 28.34%
    69.

    Greece

    3 025 260 -3 180 -0.11% 28.14%
    70.

    Austria

    2 297 880 +18 220 +0.79% 27.97%
    71.

    Estonia

    352 660 +35 520 +10.07% 27.31%
    72.

    Colombia

    12 071 960 +293 740 +2.43% 27.31%
    73.

    Bulgaria

    1 939 340 +180 180 +9.29% 27.13%
    74.

    Hungary

    2 661 040 +327 400 +12.30% 26.63%
    75.

    Dominica

    19 300 +5 580 +28.91% 26.51%
    76.

    Guadeloupe

    117 680 -40 880 -34.74% 26.50%
    77.

    Spain

    12 294 860 +60 640 +0.49% 26.44%
    78.

    Liechtenstein

    9 040 -1 360 -15.04% 25.83%
    79.

    Martinique

    104 860 +9 260 +8.83% 25.82%
    80.

    Costa Rica

    1 164 880 +95 100 +8.16% 25.79%
    81.

    Maldives

    96 240 +7 060 +7.34% 24.32%
    82.

    Lithuania

    858 900 +76 420 +8.90% 24.23%
    83.

    San Marino

    7 060 -1 880 -26.63% 22.43%
    84.

    Philippines

    22 316 340 +3 251 300 +14.57% 22.34%
    85.

    Bosnia and Herzegovina

    1 009 440 +96 900 +9.60% 21.84%
    86.

    Netherlands

    3 555 500 +108 920 +3.06% 21.19%
    87.

    Kuwait

    585 320 -39 820 -6.80% 20.99%
    88.

    Palestine

    521 120 +50 720 +9.73% 20.72%
    89.

    Panama

    685 740 +7 460 +1.09% 20.11%
    90.

    Tunisia

    2 068 320 +276 900 +13.39% 19.53%
    91.

    French Polynesia

    55 600 +3 420 +6.15% 19.37%
    92.

    Mauritius

    245 040 +6 120 +2.50% 18.94%
    93.

    Jordan

    1 205 600 +116 800 +9.69% 18.82%
    94.

    Germany

    15 096 500 +1 286 020 +8.52% 18.35%
    95.

    Jamaica

    515 200 +73 920 +14.35% 18.09%
    96.

    Mexico

    20 221 700 +1 773 000 +8.77% 17.98%
    97.

    French Guiana

    41 340 +9 720 +23.51% 17.54%
    98.

    Dominican Republic

    1 712 720 +265 940 +15.53% 17.43%
    99.

    Ecuador

    2 332 440 +349 800 +15.00% 15.77%
    100.

    Peru

    4 448 200 +591 240 +13.29% 14.87%
    101.

    Tuvalu

    1 760 +800 +45.45% 14.22%
    102.

    Indonesia

    34 498 920 +2 714 840 +7.87% 14.20%
    103.

    Belize

    43 680 +4 260 +9.75% 13.89%
    104.

    Poland

    5 280 200 +739 940 +14.01% 13.73%
    105.

    Palau

    2 780 +820 +29.50% 13.37%
    106.

    Fiji

    117 640 +17 560 +14.93% 12.45%
    107.

    Romania

    2 686 460 +555 880 +20.69% 12.23%
    108.

    Suriname

    58 400 +11 900 +20.38% 12.00%
    109.

    El Salvador

    724 960 +128 760 +17.76% 11.98%
    110.

    Thailand

    7 859 400 +944 800 +12.02% 11.84%
    111.

    Saudi Arabia

    3 038 020 -236 440 -7.78% 11.81%
    112.

    Latvia

    250 480 +25 940 +10.36% 11.29%
    113.

    Guyana

    82 020 +10 900 +13.29% 10.96%
    114.

    Georgia

    491 060 +74 500 +15.17% 10.67%
    115.

    Northern Mariana Islands

    4 960 -15 320 -308.87% 9.63%
    116.

    Bolivia

    930 900 +42 860 +4.60% 9.36%
    117.

    Honduras

    724 440 +165 000 +22.78% 9.07%
    118.

    Morocco

    2 780 140 +333 840 +12.01% 8.79%
    119.

    Cape Verde

    40 140 +6 140 +15.30% 7.89%
    120.

    Guatemala

    1 022 020 +94 660 +9.26% 7.54%
    121.

    South Korea

    3 640 700 +1 146 660 +31.50% 7.49%
    122.

    Paraguay

    466 640 +64 440 +13.81% 7.32%
    123.

    South Africa

    3 465 460 +13 460 +0.39% 7.06%
    124.

    Oman

    203 480 -15 920 -7.82% 6.86%
    125.

    Egypt

    5 199 780 +604 620 +11.63% 6.46%
    126.

    Djibouti

    47 200 +820 +1.74% 6.37%
    127.

    Nicaragua

    375 700 +68 280 +18.17% 6.27%
    128.

    Guam

    10 760 -58 780 -546.28% 6.03%
    129.

    Bhutan

    40 900 +3 400 +8.31% 5.84%
    130.

    Brazil

    11 497 240 +2 675 360 +23.27% 5.72%
    131.

    Namibia

    108 540 -1 600 -1.47% 5.10%
    132.

    Botswana

    96 820 -4 620 -4.77% 4.77%
    133.

    Algeria

    1 510 000 +122 920 +8.14% 4.37%
    134.

    Tonga

    5 240 +140 +2.67% 4.33%
    135.

    Armenia

    123 880 +18 300 +14.77% 4.18%
    136.

    Sri Lanka

    889 080 +130 420 +14.67% 4.13%
    137.

    Libya

    267 000 +6 600 +2.47% 4.13%
    138.

    Mongolia

    122 340 +34 740 +28.40% 3.96%
    139.

    Moldova

    165 080 +26 300 +15.93% 3.82%
    140.

    Azerbaijan

    309 840 +38 200 +12.33% 3.73%
    141.

    Gabon

    56 060 +6 800 +12.13% 3.63%
    142.

    Ghana

    847 700 +109 900 +12.96% 3.48%
    143.

    Marshall Islands

    2 000 -1 360 -68.00% 3.10%
    144.

    Nepal

    897 060 +211 780 +23.61% 3.10%
    145.

    Jersey

    2 860 -41 360 -1 446.15% 3.06%
    146.

    Senegal

    423 560 +56 020 +13.23% 3.01%
    147.

    Federated States of Micronesia

    3 200 -3 280 -102.50% 2.98%
    148.

    US Virgin Islands

    3 240 -32 080 -990.12% 2.95%
    149.

    The Gambia

    53 760 +7 340 +13.65% 2.95%
    150.

    Russia

    3 766 680 +570 620 +15.15% 2.70%
    151.

    Kenya

    1 015 100 +18 920 +1.86% 2.53%
    152.

    Mayotte

    5 620 -2 940 -52.31% 2.43%
    153.

    Samoa

    5 320 -120 -2.26% 2.42%
    154.

    Vatican City

    20 -860 -4 300.00% 2.41%
    155.

    Ukraine

    1 091 940 +123 020 +11.27% 2.40%
    156.

    Belarus

    225 040 +31 380 +13.94% 2.34%
    157.

    Solomon Islands

    12 880 +4 980 +38.66% 2.16%
    158.

    Vanuatu

    4 640 -880 -18.97% 2.12%
    159.

    Pakistan

    3 653 140 +577 660 +15.81% 2.06%
    160.

    Vietnam

    1 836 240 -49 100 -2.67% 2.05%
    161.

    Kiribati

    2 300 +500 +21.74% 2.04%
    162.

    Iraq

    586 440 +175 760 +29.97% 1.98%
    163.

    Swaziland

    25 760 +3 700 +14.36% 1.90%
    164.

    Nigeria

    2 844 940 +673 460 +23.67% 1.87%
    165.

    India

    20 475 220 +3 187 160 +15.57% 1.75%
    166.

    Japan

    2 182 860 +382 020 +17.50% 1.72%
    167.

    Guernsey

    1 080 -23 120 -2 140.74% 1.67%
    168.

    Mauritania

    50 880 +11 180 +21.97% 1.59%
    169.

    Cambodia

    233 840 +42 320 +18.10% 1.59%
    170.

    Cameroon

    305 620 +50 320 +16.46% 1.58%
    171.

    Kazakhstan

    239 940 +40 960 +17.07% 1.55%
    172.

    Haiti

    145 960 +19 500 +13.36% 1.51%
    173.

    Åland Islands

    380 -8 020 -2 110.53% 1.37%
    174.

    Angola

    141 280 +35 960 +25.45% 1.08%
    175.

    Zambia

    127 700 +36 180 +28.33% 1.06%
    176.

    Yemen

    231 580 +53 740 +23.21% 0.99%
    177.

    Central African Republic

    46 280 +34 520 +74.59% 0.96%
    178.

    Bangladesh

    1 425 940 +232 640 +16.31% 0.90%
    179.

    Equatorial Guinea

    5 780 -1 300 -22.49% 0.89%
    180.

    Lesotho

    16 920 -1 040 -6.15% 0.88%
    181.

    Nauru

    120 -80 -66.67% 0.86%
    182.

    Togo

    50 620 +4 580 +9.05% 0.82%
    183.

    Benin

    71 760 +5 700 +7.94% 0.79%
    184.

    Uganda

    263 320 +13 340 +5.07% 0.79%
    185.

    Republic of the Congo

    32 480 +6 800 +20.94% 0.79%
    186.

    Rwanda

    79 260 +9 360 +11.81% 0.72%
    187.

    Madagascar

    143 640 +20 640 +14.37% 0.67%
    188.

    Kyrgyzstan

    36 620 +4 680 +12.78% 0.66%
    189.

    Laos

    41 240 +3 740 +9.07% 0.59%
    190.

    Sierra Leone

    29 800 +16 520 +55.44% 0.57%
    191.

    Tanzania

    236 680 +24 700 +10.44% 0.56%
    192.

    Mali

    74 120 +17 780 +23.99% 0.54%
    193.

    São Tomé and Príncipe

    920 -860 -93.48% 0.52%
    194.

    Afghanistan

    147 780 +57 540 +38.94% 0.51%
    195.

    American Samoa

    320 -4 060 -1 268.75% 0.49%
    196.

    Papua New Guinea

    28 760 +5 800 +20.17% 0.48%
    197.

    Comoros

    3 680 -2 640 -71.74% 0.48%
    198.

    Malawi

    71 660 +6 600 +9.21% 0.46%
    199.

    Democratic Republic of Congo

    315 640 +231 320 +73.29% 0.45%
    200.

    Mozambique

    82 220 +8 020 +9.75% 0.37%
    201.

    Burkina Faso

    59 840 +5 700 +9.53% 0.37%
    202.

    Ethiopia

    253 020 +43 120 +17.04% 0.29%
    203.

    Turkmenistan

    12 560 +3 640 +28.98% 0.25%
    204.

    Eritrea

    14 340 +3 400 +23.71% 0.25%
    205.

    Guinea

    21 440 +7 800 +36.38% 0.21%
    206.

    Uzbekistan

    54 940 +8 600 +15.65% 0.20%
    207.

    Tajikistan

    13 540 +3 160 +23.34% 0.18%
    208.

    Burundi

    17 220 +7 640 +44.37% 0.17%
    209.

    Niger

    26 800 +5 140 +19.18% 0.17%
    210.

    Somalia

    15 280 +8 400 +54.97% 0.15%
    211.

    Chad

    12 880 +8 000 +62.11% 0.12%
    212.

    China

    693 540 +573 960 +82.76% 0.05%
    213.

    Réunion

    157 420 +5 320 +3.38% 0.00%
    16
    Nov

    My blog is carbon neutral

    I have now added a ‘Carbon Neutral’ icon in the sidebar of this blog. I did this as part of the “My blog is carbon neutral” initiative. It was originally started in Germany by the “Make it Green” programme, that has the goal to reduce carbon dioxide emissions.

    They plant a tree for your blog and thereby neutralise your blog’s carbon footprint for the next 50 years!

    Is your blog carbon neutral?

    Everyone can make a small contribution to the environment. Every tree counts!

    So why don’t you add it to your blog too? Click Here to learn how.

    16
    Nov

    Great Video – a life on Facebook

    Amazing video by Maxime Luère about the life of a man seen through his Facebook profile.

    Note: this video keeps being deleted due to copyright infringement (ABKCO doesn’t appreciate that this is exactly the type of viral videos that will drive the sales on their title…) so Let Me Google That For You.

    08
    Nov

    The ideal Social Media Agency model

    There was an interesting post on Mumbrella recently, where the editor described what business model, he believes, a social media agency should adopt.

    There were over 30 comments, some of which raised a lot of good points (the others simply there to promote how great a job they are doing). I have tried to compile these into a checklist of what the perfect Social Media Agency needs to have/do. Most of what follows was written by Tim Burrowes, Mark Higginson and Martin Walsh, thanks!

    What?

    Firstly, as hightlighted by a large number of comments, it is important to accurately define what Social Media is, as depending on who you listen to its definition is ever evolving. So far it seems that Social Media can be used by companies for the following 5 reasons:

    - Engagement with consumers (which includes but is broader than just online reputation management & digital PR)
    - Sales channel and lead generator (Dell, IBM)
    - Customer Service (Comcast, Dell, Telstra)
    - Product Development/Innovation (Crowdsourced R&D, product development – Dell, Starbucks, Ducati)
    - Collaboration (Politics like Obama campaign, Enterprise stuff like Yammer / SharePoint / Lotus Connections in the enterprise)

    So a Social Media agency could focus on one of those components only, or try to be a full service agency answering to any of these needs – with defining a Social Media Strategy being the overarching element.

    Where?

    Social Media sites include everything from blogs, forums, communities, product reviews & ratings, RSS, chat & WIKI’s, social media newsrooms, audio & video, social media press releases, social bookmarks and widgets – and all of these declined on desktops and on mobiles.

    Social Networking is NOT Social Media Marketing. ie. simply creating a presence on Twitter or Facebook or LinkedIn or creating a blog, without developing a strategy, without understanding the social behaviour of your audiences, without understanding which social technologies are appropriate for your audiences and without developing a strategy, does not constitute social media marketing.

    Choosing the appropriate social media site to target will depend on the social behaviour of your audience and your goals, objectives & strategy. Some content works best on some sites than others depending on the audience you are targetting.

    source:ideacouture.com

    Who?

    Such an agency would need the following attributes/expertise:

    • Strategist - able to see the ‘big picture’, understand the client’s requirements and challenges and able to define tactics, KPI’s, engagement and messaging.
    • Monitoring team – using best of breed tools.
    • PR experience to engage conversations and manage any potential PR disasters.
    • Training programs for clients.
    • Ability to set up Social Media policies, procedures and structures.
    • Quality content creator.
    • Means of rapidly producing and editing decent video content.
    • Good SEO capabilities
    • Web analytics expertise to develop insights and measurement strategies.
    • A specialist events team (which I guess goes hand in hand with the PR component)
    • Web Developers able to customise any set up across multiple sites, develop apps and widgets, to ensure that you stand out.

    I don’t think an agency would necessarily need to have all these skills in-house, it could collaborate with 3rd parties to provide this range of services to its client. The key here will be to make sure that anyone working on a project is 100% across the strategy previously defined.

    How?

    This is the Social Influence Marketing framework recommended by Martin Walsh, and its sums it up pretty well:

    1. Listen & benchmark – hearing is not listening and if you don’t at first benchmark your share of voice and that of your competitors, your sentiment, the volume of posts, volume of authors and volume of domains, map the influencer ecosystem and develop conversation maps, then you’ve got no insight to develop a strategy and importantly nothing to measure your efforts against.
    2. People – understand the social technographic profile of your target audiences
    3. Goals & Objectives – speaks for itself
    4. Strategy – speaks for itself
    5. Content Strategy – content is still king and it’s critical to invest in content, map out a content strategy across all the channels and create content suited to the technology, tools & platform and the social behaviour of your audiences.
    6. Technology – choose appropriate technologies, tools, platforms & networks based upon the social behaviour and location of your audience.
    7. Engagement – social media is not a passive medium and doesn’t follow traditional marketing rules – what are your engagement models, rules, workflow, roles & responsibilities and your resourcing plan. But focus on identifying the key influencers by using the following metrics:Share of Voice, Sentiment, Post Volume, Author Volume, Domain Volume.
    8. Search & Social Media plan – meta data planning, coordination and optimisation are critical for discovery across earned & owned media.
    9. Measurement – how will you monitor, measure and optimise activity, influence and behaviour and what insightful & actionable KPI’s will you use.

    To conclude I will quote Martin Walsh once again(!): Social Media is just one small part of the total picture and should work in conjunction with everything else, not as a means to an end on its own. Indeed, the end may not even require this means at all.

    28
    Apr

    Social Media Policies

    Just came across some great websites with examples of social media policies implemented by companies and institutions worldwide:

    http://socialmediagovernance.com/policies.php

    http://www.socialmediatoday.com/SMC/155843

    http://laurelpapworth.com/enterprise-list-of-40-social-media-staff-guidelines/

    Have you developed one for your business?

    28
    Feb

    Manage your multiple Social Media Status

    It has been widely publicised that Google released Google Buzz – it’s anti-twitter platform – a few weeks ago. For those of you not familiar with Google Buzz you should check this video:

    I am not convinced that this will ‘kill’ twitter, I rather think that people will use Google Buzz as another channel to spread their thoughts/messages.

    The challenge though is that between Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and now Google Buzz it becomes a full-time job to update your social media status! Even though some social media experts will tell you that you should adapt each message to their respective channel, I don’t have that much to say and would much rather find a way to automate everything.

    To date, I keep my Facebook separated from all my other social media as I really see it as personal. However I have linked Twitter to my Blog using twitter feed, manage my ‘direct’ tweets from hootsuite for both my Twitter account as well as our agency’s, I have linked my Tweets to Linkedin and the last thing I was trying to do was to link my Tweets to Google Buzz.

    I spent a while looking at how to do this a couple of weeks ago, I read some posts about adding Gadgets through URLs etc, but none of these were doing what I wanted, simply insert any tweet I make into my Google Buzz feed.

    I decided to have another look at this today and found out that it is now an official Google feature.

    Adding your twitter account in Google Buzz is now very easy. First open your Gmail Account and then click on Buzz it will redirect you to your Google Buzz screen. Then click on connected sites next to your profile photo / Edit / Followers. Click on ‘add’ and it will ask your twitter name just put your twitter name and that’s it you have done with it. Your tweet will appear in Google Buzz depends on traffic from 1 min to 1 hour.

    So for the time being I choose to keep Twitter as the ‘master control’ of my social networks status update, but this might change if I find a good reason for it :)

    28
    Nov

    Viral patterns of social networking websites adoption

    Facebook is big, Facebook is massive, Facebook is number 1 – but that is not the case everywhere… and I wondered why.

    1- A bit of History:
    - Friendster was launched in 2002
    - Hi5 was launched in October 2003
    - Myspace was officialy launched in January 2004
    - Orkut was launched in January 2004
    - Facebook was launched in February 2004
    - Bebo was launched in January 2005

    2 – Let’s look at the raw data:
    I went through Alexa’s top 100 sites per country to see how the following social networking websites were ranking: Facebook, Myspace, Bebo, Orkut, Hi5, Friendsters, and…Twitter (even though I know it is not exactly a social networking website):

    I have highlighted in yellow the ‘anomalies’:
    - Hi5 strength in Mexico and Central America
    - Orkut domination in Brazil and second place in India.
    - Linkedin 3rd position in the UK and India
    - None of the major Social Networks being in China top 100
    - Bebo’s second position in NZ (also big in Ireland)
    - One that is not in this table: Friendster strength in Asia

    Visit this website for a detailed analysis of each of these social networks (and more) presence in these countries.

    3 – Let’s try to understand why this has happened?

    Hi5 strength in Mexico and Central America
    Hi5 used to be the largest social network in the Spanish-speaking countries (except for Google’s Orkut, which dominates Brazil), it has now been taken over by Facebook but remains a close secod.
    San Francisco-based hi5 gained its position by doing things like introducing a Spanish version of its site in 2006, while market leaders Facebook and MySpace focused on US growth.
    Spanish-speakers made up 40% of the site’s 59.6 million January visitors. (Forbes claims that overall, Hi5 gets about a quarter of Facebook’s traffic and a little less than half of MySpace’s, according to comScore.)

    Orkut domination in Brazil and second place in India.
    Orkut took over Brazil for the following reasons:
    Most of the info as sourced from Search Engine Journal

    • Brazilians are incredibly community oriented and refer to groups as Tribalistas, or tribos. Social Networking caught on really quick in Brazil because of this relevance to everyday life.
    • Although Brazilians are some of the most outgoing people I’ve ever met, they are quite cautious when meeting others and inviting them into their circle of friends. By using a service like Orkut, users can prequalify the new friends they make by judging their ability to access the Internet, write and read correctly, and see which friends they share.
    • Orkut is very easy to pronounce in Portuguese. Try telling someone from Brazil to go to Friendster.com or MySpace. The names of those sites are lost in translation.
    • The fact that Orkut is now associated with Brazil has added flame to the popularity fire. This is a country which is quite proud of their culture, economic position in South America, and World Domination of Soccer (futbol). Now, they are proud to have Orkut as their own.
    • A lot of Brazilians moved away from their home city so Social Networking is a way to keep in touch with groups of friends much easier than mass emails.
    • And least but not last, there has been a bit of controversy about Brazilians taking over Orkut and by mostly speaking in portuguese which drove US users to other social networks.

    Indians initially adopted Orkut for different reasons:

    • Facebook, at first, was restricted users to university students in the U.S.
    • Facebook heavy reliance on graphics was an issue as most Indian users have slower connections, and the stripped-down look at Orkut loads more quickly for them.
    • We can assume that India’s internet users being very technical might have come to love and respect Google even more than in the rest of the world.

    Linkedin 3rd position in the UK and India
    The UK have hit the 3 million users mark or about 5% of the total population! To read some interesting facts about Linkedin UK users click here.

    The sheer size of India’s workforce and focus on internet explains why it has become so active on linkedin. LinkedIn.com is believed to have attracted over 2.5 million users from India. On a year-on-year basis, the number of Indian users has increased by almost 180 per cent from less than a million. The company has recently hired an India country head.

    LinkedIn users from India are largely male IT executives. Education institutes and universities are the networking site’s biggest users.

    None of the major Social Networks being in China top 100
    Facebook has not seen explosive growth is China, probably for the following reasons

    • An Internet culture there that prizes anonymity (because of close government scrutiny of online activity)
    • The popularity of different social applications and games in China, and young users more focused on entertainment sites than social networking.
    • The infamous “Great Firewall” of China could prove a long-term obstacle to Facebook’s expansion there.
    • The strength of China’s major social networking / IM website www.qq.com

    Bebo’s second position in NZ (also big in Ireland)
    Bebo was the number one social networking website in New Zealand until very recently. No real explanations seems to be exist to this phenomenon.

    In Ireland Bebo is the most popular networking site with 850,000 visitors, followed by Facebook with 800,000. Just under half a million adults – 14% of the population – are visitors to both sites. Myspace is rather less popular, with around 300,000 visitors.

    Friendster strength in Asia
    The company started in Mountain View, California, before moving its headquarters two years ago to San Francisco, “the most Asian of U.S. cities,” says Friendster president Kent Lindstrom. As a result, thousands of early adopters were Asian-American Californians who formed a nucleus that quickly expanded across the Pacific as users invited friends and relatives in Asia to join the network. Until last fall, Friendster was available only in English, but that didn’t impede its growth in Southeast Asia, where colonial history has left high English proficiency and romanized Asian languages. Source

    4 – What are the major players doing about it?

    • Myspace released a Brazilian version and is about to release a social network dedicated to India.
    • Facebook has been aggressively trying to convince Orkut Indians and Brazilians users to change networks thanks to an ‘easy contact import’ tool that Google disabled soon after
    • Google announced that Orkut would now be operated out of Brazil.
    • Facebook growth in NZ is affecting Bebo, which recently had to lay off staff.
    • Linkedin just signed a partnership deal with Twitter.
    • Friendster’s CEO is now based in Sydney, Australia to be closer to its Asian audience.

    5 – So what are the learning for anyone planning to launch a social network?

    • Think about the languages issues and try to get a translation done asap.
    • Do not limit your audience (like Facebook did with colleges).
    • Think about the technical limitations of each market you are targeting.
    • Choose a name that will be easy to pronounce in most languages.
    • Reach key influencers in key countries.
    • The sooner you reach critical mass in a market the harder it will be to beat you – but it won’t be impossible… see how Facebook did it.

    For more interesting social networking stats click here

    17
    Sep

    Social Marketing Playbook

    I just came across the Social Marketing playbook by the IAB.

    The goal of this playbook is to help marketers:

    • Provide a framework for establishing a set of clear objectives for their social marketing strategy
    • Move beyond the checklist approach and provide a filter for evaluating the myriad of opportunities and platforms
    • Think of social marketing as an opportunity to have a continuous, valuable exchange with their customers
    • Think about extensions to amplify offline campaigns
    View more documents from Lorenzo Mendoza.
    carbon neutral shopping coupons with kaufDA.de